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Saturday, July 20, 2019

 
The Eagle Has Landed

Today is the 50th anniversary of the first manned landing on the Moon. These images appeared in my post on the 35th anniversary.
































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Sunday, June 30, 2019

 
Antifa Attack In Portland

Journalist Andy Ngo was assaulted during the protest.

This Mitt Romney tweet did not age well.  The guy can size up Russia, but he can't recognize domestic terrorism when he sees it?

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Happy Birthday, Thomas Sowell

AEI celebrates.

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Monday, May 27, 2019

 
Choose The Form Of The Destructor!

The Brexit Party won 29 out of 73 of the UK's seats in the European parliament.


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Saturday, May 25, 2019

 
It's Just A Spring Clean From The May Scene

Theresa May resigns.

Musical reference.




 

Update: Check out this image in Instapundit comments.

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Friday, April 19, 2019

 
Oxymoron Du Jour

Associated Press headline: Tourist mecca Notre Dame also revered as place of worship.

Now imagine of some Islamic organization's project were described as a "crusade."

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Monday, April 15, 2019

 
Fire At Notre Dame Cathedral

Spire Falls At Paris' Notre Dame As Cathedral Is Engulfed In Flames



 
Taxes Are Due



No genie will come to bail you out. Hand it over.

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Sunday, April 07, 2019

 
The Sun Never Sets On The British Empire

I tricked Armstrong, Aldrin into planting UK flag on moon

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Thursday, March 14, 2019

 
Bomb Cyclone!

Not exactly what the National Weather Service has been warning us about...





Sunday, February 17, 2019

 
WHat Is The Central Flaw Of Communism And Socialism?

Sarah Hoyt offers this answer: "It is this: the left thinks that wealth can’t be created or destroyed."

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Sunday, February 10, 2019

 
What's Happening in Venezuela?

(Hat tip to Facebook friend Judith Weiss)




 
Sandmann Song Parody

(To the tune of "Sandman" by America.)

Ain’t it sunny outside
All the high school kids abound
Bus not yet curbside
Let’s go stand and wait around

Funny, I was there
And you were nowhere near
What went down was not what you did hear

Cause I understand you bought the story from the man
Who faced down the kid called the Sandmann
He told the lie that caught the media eye
And brought a wave of misunderstaindin’

Ain’t the hours gone by fast
Other video was witnessed
Will the press now ask
Why his tale was inconsistent?

Funny, I was there
And you weren’t nowhere near
What went down was not what you did hear

Cause I understand you bought the story from the man
Who faced down the kid called the Sandmann
He told the lie that caught the media eye
And brought a wave of misunderstaindin’

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Friday, February 08, 2019

 
The Covington Legal Team Is Playing With A Full Deck

It's about time I start coming back to my long-neglected blog. The news of the Covington 54 provided the right inspiration. I call this the Deck of Reckless Accusers. Click the image to enlarge. Note the news crawlers under the images of S. E. Cupp and Joy Reid. The Queen of Spades was the easiest pick.

Update: I corrected some color mismatches, and added a third joker - they're going after Nathan Phillips.


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Monday, February 22, 2016

 
Gone!


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Thursday, February 18, 2016

 
These Are The People Who Have Been Running Public Education For The Past Generation


American Thinker has some background.

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Wednesday, February 17, 2016

 
May The Odds Be Ever In Your Favor


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Wednesday, February 10, 2016

 
Bernie Sanders - The European Candidate

Michael Filozof writes:

If Bernie's European-style socialism does come to America, it will be an utter disaster. Euro-socialism works because Europe still has a socially stratified society. A British girl who is born a princess or a baroness knows from the time she is a toddler that she is a princess or baroness – and the daughter of a working-class soccer yob knows from the time she is a toddler that she will never, ever be a princess or baroness. The purpose of European socialism is to buy off the lower classes to maintain the existing social order, and the European elites do a reasonably good job of managing socialist programs because maintaining their superior status depends upon it.

But in the United States, everyone is born equal under the law. The American attitude was always that any individual could enrich himself beyond his wildest dreams – but his ambition was tempered by the fact that he could just as well fall into complete destitution. Socialism in America would eliminate the latter – but not the former. American socialism would turn into the same kind of corruption, plunder, and special-interest favoritism that Sanders decries in the private sector.

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Monday, January 18, 2016

 
Happy Civil Rights Day!

(An annual blog tradition continues.)

In 2006 I mulled over the idea that instead of having a Martin Luther King Day we should have a Civil Rights Day, so that we can have a single holiday for all civil rights crusaders, and, for symbolic reasons, it should be set on July 5, the day after we celebrate out nation's independence. As stated in that post, I had originally considered that Civil Rights Day replace Labor Day, but I have long since settled on the latter holiday giving way to Commerce Day, a day for celebrating all the contributors to our economy and not just labor.

A July 5 holiday for any reason is even a bigger pipe dream than Commerce Day, and the MLK Day tradition is already firmly entrenched, so from this day forward I will recognize the third Monday of January as Civil Rights Day. Dr. King will always get a little extra notice for being the one to inspire the holiday, but the table of honor will feature all civil rights leaders past and present.

Following is my original argument for the holiday:
--
For years I'd heard news stories about debates over whether or not to establish an official Martin Luther King holiday, and never did anyone report the arguments against. I always suspected that one was that we had way too many day-off-of-work holidays as it was. Having one three weeks after Christmas does seem a bit superfluous. MLK Day would be only the third national holiday named after a person, the others being Christmas and Columbus Day, commemorating the chief catalyst for Western culture and the chief catalyst for extending Western culture to the Americas. (In the case of the latter, make that Western cultures; English and Iberian influences were vastly different.) Some, I imagine, feel that only those rare individuals who have had such a radical impact should have holidays named for them. Dr. King isn't in that league; the only Americans who are are the Founders; their holiday is July 4.

Here's my argument against making January 15 [Update: MLK Day is celebrated on the third Monday of January, which happens to fall on the 15th in 2003] an official holiday: it's not fair to everyone else involved in the civil rights movement. Independence Day isn't just about one guy. We have a holiday for all those who made the Declaration of Independence happen. We should have a federal holiday called Civil Rights Day. It would be like Memorial Day, honoring leaders of past civil rights struggles instead of soldiers of past wars.

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Friday, December 25, 2015

 
The Reasons For The Season

(Original posted on December 23, 2002)

While Christmas is officially a celebration of the birth of Jesus, for much of the Western world December 25 has come to be a celebration of family and community. No other time of the year is so thoroughly saturated with images pointing to our highest hopes for such relationships - and no other time of the year so effectively highlights the difference between our ideals and the world as it really is. Jesus came to Earth to bridge not only the chasm between humanity and God, but also that rift that separates people from each other. Christmas reminds us that we live in a broken world, and it seeks to encourage us by showing us through religious and even many secular trappings how that brokenness can be fixed.

Best of holiday wishes to all my readers.

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Friday, December 11, 2015

 
Who Ya Gonna Call?

Time to start overcoming blogger burnout. Let's start with this headline:

Glenn Reynolds: Liberals have chosen The Donald as their 'Destructor'

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Monday, December 07, 2015

 
Day of Infamy, Day of Hope

Today is the anniversary of the Japanese strike against Pearl Harbor. After many years, the war still provokes disagreements between and within both countries. Books, notably Robert W. Stinnett's Day of Deceit and John Toland's Infamy: Pearl Harbor and Its Aftermath, claim that FDR intentionally provoked Japan into starting a war and that he had advance knowledge of the attack. The Japanese have debated among themselves over the treatment of the war in textbooks and proposals such as the issuance of a formal apology for the war and revision of its postwar constitution. Naturally, the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki is a rich source of debate; surprisingly, the Japanese themselves are divided over the ethics of those attacks.

Factions can disagree over the conduct of a war and still find much common ground over what to do with its aftermath. The US and Japan set in motion policies that would promote an amicable political bond and deep cultural ties between our nations. We don't always achieve both goals with nations with whom we haven't warred.

Everybody knows the day of infamy. The day of hope is every December 7 of Japanese-American alliance and friendship.

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Monday, July 06, 2015

 
The Greek Financial Crisis Meets Rudyard Kipling And Stein's Law



The original poem here.

Stein's Law cited here, in an article about Detroit's tailspin, with passing reference to "insolvent social-democratic Europe."

The parody first appeared in comments to this Powerline post.

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Saturday, July 04, 2015

 
Odes To Liberty

Original posted July 4, 2002. Most years a change is made:

2003 Original image of WTC replaced with mini-collage of WTC, Liberty Bell, and the flag raising on Mount Suribachi.
2004 Image of young girl celebrating the liberation Iraq; LOTR quote.
2005 Iraqi girl image replaced by Iraqi voter; Cathy Seipp quote via Samizdata.
2006 Viktor Frankl quote
2007 Oriana Fallaci quote
2008 William F. Buckley quote
2009 YouTube video, scene from "John Adams" miniseries
2010 Tea Party protest sign
2011 YouTube video essay of the Battle of Yorktown

--
The scene from "John Adams" shows the meeting of the Second Continental Congress, at which the vote for independence from Great Britain is conducted, and (at 3:07) the public reading of the Declaration of Independence.



The Declaration formally proclaimed our independence - the Battle of Yorktown won it.



Through these fields of destruction
Baptisms of fire
I've watched all your suffering
As the battle raged higher
And though they did hurt me so bad
In the fear and alarm
You did not desert me
My brothers in arms

Dire Straits, "Brothers in Arms"

"Then I will live in Montana, and I will marry a round American woman and raise rabbits and she will cook them for me. And I will have a pickup truck, or possibly even a recreational vehicle, and drive from state to state. Do they let you do that?"

Vasili Borodin (played by Sam Neill), The Hunt for Red October

"'We hold these truths to be self-evident... That all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights... That among these are Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness... That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men ...'. And this paper that from the French Revolution on the whole West has copied, from which each of us has drawn inspiration, still constitutes the backbone of America. Her vital lymph. Know why? Because it transforms the subjects into citizens. Because it turns the plebes into people. Because it invites, no, it orders the plebes turned into citizens to rebel against tyranny and to govern themselves. To express their individualities, to search for their own happiness. (Something that for the poor, for the plebes, means to get rich). The exact contrary, in short, of what the communists used to do with their practice of forbidding people to govern themselves, to express themselves, to get rich. With their practice of installing His Majesty the State on the throne."

Oriana Fallaci, The Rage and the Pride

"With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood."

Martin Luther King
"There is an inverse relationship between reliance on the state and self-reliance."

William F. Buckley
"The State exists simply to promote and to protect the ordinary happiness of human beings in this life. A husband and wife chatting over a fire, a couple of friends having a game of darts in a pub, a man reading a book in his own room or digging in his own garden - that is what the State is there for. And unless they are helping to increase and prolong and protect such moments, all the laws, parliaments, armies, courts, police, economics, etc., are simply a waste of time."

C. S. Lewis, Mere Christianity

 photo IraqiVoter.jpg"Funny that the same people to whom diversity is a holy word so often bemoan diversity of opinion as divisive. But in a democracy, politics are naturally divisive: you vote for this candidate and someone else votes for that one; you vote yes (or no) on a proposition and other citizens disagree. What's not divisive? Saddam and his 99.96% of the vote. That's how it went during the previous Iraqi election -- an illustration of the Latin roots of the word fascism, which actually means a bunch of sticks all tied together in one big unhappy unified bunch, and not (despite what many assume) any variation from p.c. received-wisdom regarding gay rights, affirmative action, bilingual education, etc. This election was different because it was divisive, which means it was better."

Cathy Seipp (Samizdata quote of the day, February 01, 2005)

"It's all wrong. By rights we shouldn't even be here. But we are. It's like in the great stories, Mr. Frodo. The ones that really mattered. Full of darkness and danger they were. And sometimes you didn't want to know the end. Because how could the end be happy? How could the world go back to the way it was when so much bad had happened. But in the end, it's only a passing thing, this shadow. Even darkness must pass. A new day will come. And when the sun shines it will shine out the clearer. Those were the stories that stayed with you. That meant something. Even if you were too small to understand why. But I think, Mr. Frodo, I do understand. I know now. Folk in those stories had lots of chances of turning back only they didn't. Because they were holding on to something...That there's some good in this world, Mr. Frodo. And it's worth fighting for."

Sam Gamgee (played by Sean Astin), Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers

"[W]e recognize that we are living in the middle of the most overwhelmingly successful experiment in human history. Not perfect. Just the best place in the world to live in, that's all."







Jay Manifold

"I will not be pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed, debriefed or numbered! My life is my own."







Number Six (played by Patrick McGoohan, "The Prisoner" TV series)

"Patriotism means to stand by the country. It does not mean to stand by the President or any other public official save exactly to the degree in which he himself stands by the country. It is patriotic to support him insofar as he efficiently serves the country. It is unpatriotic not to oppose him to the exact extent that by inefficiency or otherwise he fails in his duty to stand by the country."







Theodore Roosevelt

This Tea Party protest sign illustrates Roosevelt's musings on patriotism - and the powers of the citizen as exercised via the ballot box:

 photo WeCanSeeNovember.jpg

"So this Jefferson dude was like, 'Look, the reason we left this England place is 'cause it was so bogus. So if we don't get some primo rules ourselves - pronto - then we're just gonna be bogus, too."







Jeff Spiccoli (played by Sean Penn), Fast Times at Ridgemont High

"Democracy extends the sphere of individual freedom, socialism restricts it. Democracy attaches all possible value to each man; socialism makes each man a mere agent, a mere number. Democracy and socialism have nothing in common but one word: equality. But notice the difference: while democracy seeks equality in liberty, socialism seeks equality in restraint and servitude."







Alexis deTocqueville, Democracy in America Vol. 2

"We who lived in concentration camps can remember the men who walked through the huts comforting others, giving away their last piece of bread. They may have been few in number, but they offer sufficient proof that everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms -- to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one's own way"







Viktor Frankl, Man's Search for Ultimate Meaning

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Sunday, June 21, 2015

 
Family Ties

My Father's Day post of 2007 is now an annual blog tradition. It has applications for the relationships revolving around both our earthly fathers and our heavenly Father.
--

Most Christians have no problem getting along with non-Christians. This may seem confusing to some; after all, Christianity teaches that those who are not reconciled with God will not receive salvation. Why care about people who aren't going to Heaven?

One could say that while a particular non-Christian is alive we really don't know that that person's eternal destination won't make a course change at a later date. That's a valid observation, but not the real reason.

Christianity makes a radical claim about the relationship between believers, nonbelievers and God: we're all family. God created the souls of all, thus he is the father of all, believers and nonbelievers alike. All of the children have gone astray - but some have reconciled with him while others have not.

When one is faced with the earthly parallel - being in good standing with Dad while some of the other siblings aren't - one is charged with three tasks: to build and maintain the relationship with Dad, to build and maintain the relationships with the wayward siblings without doing anything that interferes with the paternal relationship, and to act as a bridge between the wayward siblings and Dad. That third task is tricky; there will be occasions to discuss the rift outright, but most of the time it involves nothing more than being a positive influence to that sibling.

Christianity works the same way. Loving God doesn't mean giving up on non-Christian friends. We may have to reassess what kinds of "fun" we pursue with them, though. (Heck, sometimes we have to reassess the "fun" we pursue with fellow Christians.) Witnessing to nonbelievers isn't all Amway sales presentations. Most of the time it's just bringing good to someone's life.

The hardest part of doing good to others is when it requres criticism. We see them doing something destructive, and we want to help. We need to effectively communicate what the problem is, how it hurts that person, and how the future can be better when that problem is dealth with.

Most Christians grasp all this, even if they haven't thought it out as thoroughly as outlined here. They care about both believers and nonbelievers out of the same human motivations that drive us all, and because they believe in a God who values everyone.

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Friday, February 27, 2015

 
Leonard Nimoy (1931-2015)

Rest in peace.

Besides his iconic role as Mr. Spock, Nimoy played Paris on 49 episodes of Mission: Impossible. One of the "cover of the Rolling Stone" moments for TV celebrities back in the show's heyday was playing the guest villain in an episode of Columbo; Nimoy played a surgeon in the episode A Stitch in Crime. The non-Spock I'm most familiar with is his narration in the computer game Civilization IV.

In an uncredited early role, Nimoy played an Army sergeant in Them! The voice doesn't sound like him at all, but that's him. I'm guessing the film director wanted him to speak with a more average-Joe-American accent.



Nimoy's IMDb page is here. His Wikipedia page is here.

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Saturday, February 14, 2015

 
Happy Valentine's Day

Fifty shades of Gomez and Morticia.


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Monday, January 19, 2015

 
Happy Civil Rights Day!

(An annual blog tradition continues.)

In 2006 I mulled over the idea that instead of having a Martin Luther King Day we should have a Civil Rights Day, so that we can have a single holiday for all civil rights crusaders, and, for symbolic reasons, it should be set on July 5, the day after we celebrate out nation's independence. As stated in that post, I had originally considered that Civil Rights Day replace Labor Day, but I have long since settled on the latter holiday giving way to Commerce Day, a day for celebrating all the contributors to our economy and not just labor.

A July 5 holiday for any reason is even a bigger pipe dream than Commerce Day, and the MLK Day tradition is already firmly entrenched, so from this day forward I will recognize the third Monday of January as Civil Rights Day. Dr. King will always get a little extra notice for being the one to inspire the holiday, but the table of honor will feature all civil rights leaders past and present.

Following is my original argument for the holiday:
--
For years I'd heard news stories about debates over whether or not to establish an official Martin Luther King holiday, and never did anyone report the arguments against. I always suspected that one was that we had way too many day-off-of-work holidays as it was. Having one three weeks after Christmas does seem a bit superfluous. MLK Day would be only the third national holiday named after a person, the others being Christmas and Columbus Day, commemorating the chief catalyst for Western culture and the chief catalyst for extending Western culture to the Americas. (In the case of the latter, make that Western cultures; English and Iberian influences were vastly different.) Some, I imagine, feel that only those rare individuals who have had such a radical impact should have holidays named for them. Dr. King isn't in that league; the only Americans who are are the Founders; their holiday is July 4.

Here's my argument against making January 15 [Update: MLK Day is celebrated on the third Monday of January, which happens to fall on the 15th in 2003] an official holiday: it's not fair to everyone else involved in the civil rights movement. Independence Day isn't just about one guy. We have a holiday for all those who made the Declaration of Independence happen. We should have a federal holiday called Civil Rights Day. It would be like Memorial Day, honoring leaders of past civil rights struggles instead of soldiers of past wars.

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Monday, January 12, 2015

 
Charle Hebdo And The Bigger Issue

At OnIslam.net, five Muslim academics expressed their outrage at the Charlie Hebdo attacks. Dr. Tariq Ramadan and Sheikh Omar Suleiman issued generic religion-of-peace platitudes. Dr. Wael Shihab appealed to Sura 5:32: "[W]hosoever killeth a human being for other than manslaughter or corruption in the earth, it shall be as if he had killed all mankind." On the surface, it seems many jihadi supporters would find vindication for the attacks in this sura, based on an the assumption that mocking Mohammed qualifies as "corruption" (or "mischief," in some translations). Lacking the Quranic version of a Strong's Exhaustive Concordance, I can't tell you how that root Arabic word is commonly used.

Unlike the others, Drs. Khaled Hanafy and Yasir Qadhi seek to address a root issue: whether or not Islam prescribes punishment for mockery of Mohammed. Each claims that such mockery (and even direct harassment) is recorded in the Quran, and in no event did Mohammed ever order retaliation. This approach should be further expanded upon; if the claim is correct, it will be substantiated by a list of all the suras recording such prophet-mocking incidents.

But that addresses only a subset of Islamic terror attacks. Most commonly the terrorists just want to kill non-Muslims for being non-Muslims; Boko Haram serves as a classic example.

All modern jihadi movements operate under the assumptions that a) Mohammed instructed future generations of Muslims to wage war against infidels as long as there are unconquered infidels on Earth, and b) that Islam supports private parties not authorized by governments (i.e. vigilantes) to undertake such warfare. Does Islam support either of these principles? Both Muslims and non-Muslims say yes, both Muslims and non-Muslims say no.

This post will not seek to discern whose interpretations are correct. As a Christian and a humanitarian (the Muslim world historically lags behind the West re human rights) I would prefer that Islam just go away, but it isn't, so the next best thing to hope for is the defeat of the jihadi view in the war on ideas. Unfortunately, the people best equipped to engage in that war are an ill-focused, disorganized lot.

Who has any chance of swaying Muslim opinion away from the jihadi view? Robert Spencer and Bill Maher? No. Muslims will most likely be swayed by Muslim authorities - clerics, politicians, academics. These leaders who reject the jihadi view need to organize in a united front, and put together a substantive message supporting their opposition to the jihadi view. They're not doing that. If they were, the American press so desperate to push the Religion of Peace meme would have found them.

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Wednesday, December 24, 2014

 
The Reasons For The Season

(Original posted on December 23, 2002)

While Christmas is officially a celebration of the birth of Jesus, for much of the Western world December 25 has come to be a celebration of family and community. No other time of the year is so thoroughly saturated with images pointing to our highest hopes for such relationships - and no other time of the year so effectively highlights the difference between our ideals and the world as it really is. Jesus came to Earth to bridge not only the chasm between humanity and God, but also that rift that separates people from each other. Christmas reminds us that we live in a broken world, and it seeks to encourage us by showing us through religious and even many secular trappings how that brokenness can be fixed.

Best of holiday wishes to all my readers.

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Sunday, December 07, 2014

 
Day of Infamy, Day Of Hope

A bit late in the day...

--

Today is the anniversary of the Japanese strike against Pearl Harbor. After many years, the war still provokes disagreements between and within both countries. Books, notably Robert W. Stinnett's Day of Deceit and John Toland's Infamy: Pearl Harbor and Its Aftermath, claim that FDR intentionally provoked Japan into starting a war and that he had advance knowledge of the attack. The Japanese have debated among themselves over the treatment of the war in textbooks and proposals such as the issuance of a formal apology for the war and revision of its postwar constitution. Naturally, the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki is a rich source of debate; surprisingly, the Japanese themselves are divided over the ethics of those attacks.

Factions can disagree over the conduct of a war and still find much common ground over what to do with its aftermath. The US and Japan set in motion policies that would promote an amicable political bond and deep cultural ties between our nations. We don't always achieve both goals with nations with whom we haven't warred.

Everybody knows the day of infamy. The day of hope is every December 7 of Japanese-American alliance and friendship.

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Thursday, November 27, 2014

 
A Year Of Thanksgiving

Normally this tradition list links to various posts about good news, or obituaries of persons who have enriched our lives. I've had a lot of chores keeping me busy lately. This year I'll just mention one thing for which we can be thankful: despite the onslaught from our political leadership the United States is still the freest country in the world. That benefits more than just Americans; our freedom brings, among other things, commerce and charity around the world.

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Friday, October 31, 2014

 
A Rerun Of The Seventh Blogger Costume Party

This year's theme is Alfred Hitchcock.

Little Miss Attila awaits rescue. (Lifeboat)



Mark Steyn recruits Ingrid Bergman to spy on a group of Nazis in Rio de Janeiro - he suspects they're plotting something in connection with the 2016 Olympics. (Notorious)



Tyler Cowen still prefers old-fashioned film cameras. (Rear Window)



Steve Green
wishes he hadn't gone out for that country stroll. (North By Northwest)



Iowahawk is his own mother! (Psycho)



Tammy Bruce has absolutely had it with PETA. (The Birds)

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Thursday, September 11, 2014

 
Earthquake Hits Irving, Texas

In the wee hours of the morning I heard a single thud, from directions unknown. My computer monitor shook as if someone had bumped their knee against the desk.

The culprit: a 2.9 magnitude earthquake, its epicenter near the corner of North O'Connor and Rochelle. Check out the story here; article has a few 911 call audio embeds.

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Thirteen Years Ago



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